Orks vs. Orks: Archeotech Hunt

Ethereal Mark and I decided to play the Archeotech Hunt Scenario with 1000 point ork lists.  The idea was that two big meks belonging to the same Waaagh! heard about an area rich in exotic technology ripe for the plucking.  So both meks gathered together their henchmen and snuck off … only to find their hated rival staring across at them!

We implemented a number of rules specifically for this game:

  • The warlord must be a big mek.
  • A warboss cannot be fielded by either army.
  • Big Meks and meks have the Objective Secured rule themselves, but they do not confer OS onto other members of their unit.

The boyz clash early in the fighting.

Early Game: Ethereal (or Big Mek, rather) Mark’s tankbustas sped their trukk into a ruin and blazed away at my battlewagon and deff dread.  He also began tightening a circle around my army with large numbers of boyz to my left and skorcha buggies backed up by a squadron of deffkoptas to my right.

My plan was to counter attack with the force field-protected battlewagon full of boyz supported by my walker, cut down his bold encirclement, barrage his large troop concentrations with my heavy mortars and carry off all the archeotech, then lord it over all of the other big meks … especially my rival with his fancy, yellow mega armor!  Unfortunately things didn’t turn out quite that way.

Mark’s tankbusta trukk barely weathered the fire from my battle wagon and other assets.  This allowed him to go on the attack and assault my wagon, blowing it up.  I had a bit of luck in that only a couple of the 20 choppa boyz were killed. The tank killer orks were not done yet and managed to immobilize my walker and then rushed in to finish it off, only to fall victim to its huge, snapping claws.  Still, they did finish off the dread but were now a spent force.  They had done very well all things considered!

Mark’s tankbustas had seized the initiative, throwing my forces on the defensive from which they never truly recovered despite some last ditch attempts at heroics.

Mid Game: Despite the efforts of my mortar goblins Mark’s circle was tightening.  My single deep striking deff kopta and small squad of jump orks did manage to rocket into a good position behind his forces.  As Mark later pointed out, this caused a delay while he secured the objectives in his rear area, thus slowing down the encirclement of my forces, which allowed my big mek to lead a brave counter-attack!

A meganob, looking victorious in yellow.

End Game: My warlord, seeing that all was nearly lost and that the bravest greenskins in his miserable warband were a bunch of goblins, decided to force the issue.  Leading a still large force of shoota and choppa boyz, they climbed over the smoking wrecks of enemy skorcha buggies and picked through ruins toward Mark’s advancing big mek with his boyz.  Mark’s big mek oozed confidence and was resplendent in yellow mega armor.

My leader tuned his force field to Waaagh!, raised his lucky red wrench on high, and called for the charge.  Although my boyz did inflict decent casualties among the enemy orcs with their dakka, the ruins and distance were too much and the charge failed.  The Mega Mek’s forces held despite losses and advanced into the ruins firing their weapons and building up for a counter-attack.

My brave mek made a sudden decision.  Despite still having a goodly number of willing fighters around him not to mention a enraged nob with a power klaw, he suddenly threw the whole thing up and ran from the battlefield before either group could get stuck in.

That pretty much put paid to the battle with Mark’s mega mek firmly in charge of the archeotech site and his rivals either dead or fleeing.  He won a resounding victory!  My cowardly big mek was never seen again.  Rumor has it that the aforementioned nob krumped him later or possibly my ork engineer hightailed it to parts unknown.

Happier Days, Circa 2013: Deploying into Anti-Air Formation

As a bit of a post script, the heroes of my army, the plucky artillery goblins, spiked their guns and hopped down escape tunnels that they learned how to construct from the artillery mice.  Better to live to fight another day rather than end up some nob’s lunch!

Steel Legion & Officio Assassinorum vs. Orks

The orks have seen a lot of battles versus the Imperial Guard, especially lately, though this is the first time we’ve lined up against this particular officer.  We played 1500 points and decided upon the “Big Guns Never Tire” scenario from the Eternal War series.  The goal here was to hold objectives at the end of the game and destroy your opponent’s heavy support units while preserving your own.

He had two battle tanks as his heavy support.  Other vehicles included four or five chimera and a valkyrie gunship with embarked storm troopers.  His troops were all (or at least mostly) veterans with those scary-looking german helmets and gas masks.  (We imagined that our battle was a small part of what happened during the Third War for Armageddon.  Perhaps the vindicare assassin was dispatched to kill Ghazghkull Thraka, who apparently was elsewhere.) The orks opted for a slight variation on Colonel Fixit’s Command Group list.

An ork rok hurtling in for a landing accounts for the over exposure in this picture.

Early Game: The orks had more than their share of luck in the beginning stages, which sort of set the tone for the evening. They charged ahead and despite a hail of battle cannon shells, laser fire, and volleys of grenades all of the ork vehicles were still rolling.  No one was more surprised by this than the greenskins.

Guard tanks exchanged fire with ork artillery, causing light casualties among the zzap guns.  The humans maneuvered, stacking their armor and mechanized infantry on their right flank to meet both advancing squads of trukk boyz.

Things look bad for the Vindicare Assassin but he’s all right … for now.

Mid-Game: The imperial right flank crumbled with surprisingly light ork casualties.  By the time the greenskin troopers were a spent force, they had broken through and wrecked the command chimera, Den Mother.

A valkyrie gunship reinforced the battle and along with the assassin tried to stop the nobz battlewagon rolling down the center of the field.  The half track shrugged off multiple lascannon hits, but a turbopenetrator round finally blew off a wheel and temporarily stopped the wagon.

Meanwhile a strike squad of ork jump infantry rocketed into the fray, surrounding the assassin. The assault sergeant popped a red flare and called in an air strike.  Captain Daniel, the Steel Legion company commander, ordered a nearby squad of veterans to focus fire on the stormboyz and eliminated this distraction, though the storm nob took cover and guided in the aircraft for as long as he could. The assassin, laying on his back behind some 50 gallon drums, managed to score a perfect if unlikely shot right into the MIG 15’s engine as it flew over him. Trailing oil and black smoke, the pilot returned to base his strike mission (as far as he was concerned) completed.

Looks cool but the real reason is I forgot to pack my flight stand. 😦

End Game: Despite the heroics of the vindicare assassin, a late gravchute insertion attempt by the storm troopers, and the coolness under fire of Captain Daniel, there was no stopping the orks this time.  The ork big guns fell silent.  Artillery goblins watched through periscopes and field glasses, chattering excitedly back and forth on their radios, as a greenskin ring of infantry closed around the remaining imperial platoon.  In the end the assassin spent his seventh life and died to a stray nob shoota bullet as he bravely held his position awaiting an extraction order, which never came.  Someone at the Office of Assassins will want answers to some hard questions!

We ended the game with the orks in possession of five of the six objectives and both Steel Legion heavy support tanks were burning hulks.  Hopefully the rest of the Third War for Armageddon doesn’t go as badly for the Imperium as it did here today.  Otherwise Commissar Yarrick is not going to be pleased!

Bloodletters

Like many people, I imagine, I’ve been working on some daemonkin.  I’m a fairly deliberate (slow) painter so this edition they’ll probably be used as allies.  Troops seem a good starting point for an army collection so I began with some bloodletters.

A triumvirate chosen pretty much at random as befits Chaos Daemons.

I messed around with various schemes for their horns and blades and for the latter opted for a plain look, for which I used Vallejo’s glossy black paint.  I experimented with blade highlights, but in the end decided I liked them best just black with a bit of shine.  The primer didn’t quite look right in a couple of small sections on some their swords, but I was able to camouflage this pretty well, I think, with Blood for the Blood God technical paint.  (I love that stuff!)

Here are two more — the bloodreaper upgrade character for the unit and a daemon with an instrument of chaos.  I found that I liked using gloss lacquer on their tongues, so I went back over the models I had already completed and added that detail.

The World War Two Soviet infantryman is a 28mm metal Warlord Games piece.  I included him for scale and because I finished him not too long ago.  Playing with the miniatures, one forgets sometimes how big some of these monsters would really be until you put them beside a miniature of an average-sized man and use a bit of imagination.  Heck, the horn is larger than poor Pyotr here!

Two more with their best bud, Pyotr, from the Alternate Dimensional Soviet Union.

So far I have nine bloodletters finished, which means to complete the box and the unit I only need to finish one more with a banner.  When I run them as a unit of daemonkin bloodletters I’ll probably keep them cheap and use a minimum squad of eight without upgrades.  So in that sense they are done now.  However both in Codex: Khorne Daemonkin and the base rules referring to chaos daemons, one can take some of the possible upgrades for free when a unit is summoned, assuming you have the models on hand.  So I thought I’d make sure I did. 🙂

The pack thus far excluding the two taking the selfie with Pyotr.

My next daemon project after getting the Banner of Blood done will probably be a resin Herald of Khorne I have for a cheap HQ. I could just as easily use the bloodreaper that is posing with Private Pyotr as a herald.  Since I have the herald model though, I might as well paint him.

I had a chance last night to play my small but painted Khorne force as an allied detachment and they did pretty well.  I considered waiting until August 8th (a very auspicious date for the Blood God!) but more than three weeks is far too long to keep the dog-headed god waiting for his tally of skulls.

What better place to materialize?  Let the tally of blood points begin!

They deep struck into the battle with pinpoint accuracy right in the middle of a Shrine to Khorne, but then you’d expect nothing less would you?  The daemons spread out, seeking victims only to be greeted by a withering barrage of tank and autocannon fire.  Only the herald survived and him with one arm.  He clamored up a short plateau, coming to grips with the Guard heavy weapon team. His preternatural reflexes did him little good though what with the rough terrain and the claymore-style mine booby traps, rock falls, and one particularly vicious guardsman with a serrated knife. Still, it was alright because of course “Khorne cares not from whence the blood flows so long as it flows.”

Colonel Fixit’s Command Group (1499 Points)

Colonel Valentina Fixit with Warboss Hungry, circa 2012.

  • HQ: Big Mek with kustom force field and Fixer Upperz = 100
  • HQ: Painboy = 50
  • HQ: Warboss on a bike with a power klaw = 110
  • Troop: Shoota Boyz (12), rokkit, nob with boss pole and klaw = 129
    • DT: Trukk with rokkit and reinforced ram = 35
  • Troop: Shoota Boyz (12), nob with boss pole = 99
    • DT: Trukk with big shoota and reinforced ram = 35
  • Troop: Gretchin (11) with runtherd = 38
  • Elite: Nob Bikers (3); 1. slugga & choppa, 2. big choppa, 3. power klaw = 165
  • Elite: Nobz (9); 1. boss pole & klaw, 2.-3. big choppa & shoota, 4. shoota/skorcha, 5.- 9. sluggas & choppas = 212
    • DT: Battlewagon with kill kannon, extra armor, and reinforced ram = 155
  • Heavy Support: Lobbas (3) with six krew  = 54
  • Heavy Support: Zzap Guns (3) with six krew and three ammo runts = 78
  • Heavy Support Kannons (3) with six krew = 54
  • Fast Attack: Dakkajet with three supa shootas = 130
  • Fast Attack: Stormboyz (5) with nob = 55

This list uses the codex Ork Horde detachment, mainly so we can have three HQ’s.  Sometimes Colonel Fixit takes charge of the tactical situation and is the warlord.  Other times the colonel concentrates more on the technical details (keeping the battlewagon running) and leaves the overall prosecution of the battle to the biker boss, usually a powerful lieutenant or captain.  What he lacks in survival instincts he more than makes up for in enthusiasm and lethality.

Happy lieutenant posing for the orks back home on his then brand new motorcycle, Spring 2014.

Like most of my lists, this is meant for casual games where over the last few years it has done quite well with some cinematic victories and (dare I admit?) defeats.  I’ve had to make some changes when the new codex came out, the most notable one being the painboy is now an HQ choice and not an upgrade character in a nobz squad.  I added the airplane when flyers first came out because the Sovietesque orks would certainly want to get their little green hands on a MIG 15 if they could.

Also, the warboss got his bike when I received a Forgeworld kit for a Christmas present back in 2013, and I thought he might need some nob bikers to lord it over so I added some.  I took out some of the boyz when troops became a little less important for holding objectives.  In any case, with the Ork Horde detachment my troops are no better at holding objectives than anyone else in my army so perhaps more bikers are in the works?  Only time will tell.

Warboss Command Group (Orks, 1000 Points)

A worthy try but probably still needs more dakka.

  • HQ: Warboss Hungry with power klaw & shoota, boss pole, Finking Cap = 100
  • HQ: Big Mek with kustom force field = 85
  • HQ: Painboy = 50
  • Troop: Shoota Boyz (12), rokkit, nob with boss pole = 134
    • DT: Trukk with rokkit
  • Troop: Shoota Boyz (12), big shoota, nob with boss pole = 134
    • DT: Trukk with big shoota
  • Elite: Nob Bikers (3): slugga & choppa x 2, big choppa = 140
  • Elite: Nobz (8): slugga & choppa x 4, shoota/skorcha, big choppa & shoota x 2, power klaw & waaagh banner = 339
    • DT: Battlewagon with big shoota, reinforced ram, armor plates
  • Heavy Support: Kannon = 18

I use the Ork Horde detachment from the codex, which allows me to have three HQ’s.  I personally think the Combined Arms Detachment with Objective Secured is more powerful in my games, but it is unthinkable to have Warboss Hungry expose his person to danger without his personal physician and chief engineer in attendance.  So Ork Horde it is.

Like most of my lists, this is for casual play and does pretty well at that level.  I’ve had fun playing it and people seem to enjoy playing against it.  The nobz are my boss’s elite bodyguard and collection of powerful frenemies he’s gathered together to keep an eye on them lest one of them try to usurp him.  Much, much harder to do that to his face than behind his back as experience has shown.  The bikers act as outriders for the command wagon, scouts or whatever duties it is useful to have tough, highly mobile soldiers perform.

I imagine the kannon is towed into position in the early (deployment) stages of the battle probably by one of the trukks.  The artillery mice or goblins probably cling for their lives to the gun as it lurches and bounces over rocks and debris.  Ork trukks after all seem to be only capable of one speed and that’s top speed!

American army stealing orks’ towing guns into combat idea.

Orks vs. Orks in the Necron Tomb Scenario

The mighty Ethereal Mark, and the Thursday Night 40K gang.

Mark was kind enough to try out the Necron Tomb Portal Scenario in a 1000 point Ork versus Ork game.  Since were playing this scenario we agreed that using this terrain piece was mandatory.  A pity we couldn’t find the cord to plug it in!

He ran a varied list headed up by a weirdboy, a goodly number of boyz on foot and on wheels, as well as his usually tricky stuff like kommandos, deffkoptas, buggies and so on.  (I think Mark leans more toward the spirit of Mork than Gork!)  I opposed his machinations with my “Warboss Command Platoon,” which was Warboss Hungry, his personal physician (painboy), and his chief engineer/bottle washer (big mek with a force field), and a bunch of nobz.  Of course they were all crammed into his Mobile Command Vehicle/battle wagon.  Everything else was to protect and support this.

The game was quite bloody as was expected and when we called it due to time Hungry’s forces were ahead by only a single point.  I’ve played the basic scenario a few times now with various people so I thought I’d share a few observations about it here.

  • We’ve found that the Necrons aren’t a big threat in the beginning, but they grow in power as the game wears on because of the players grinding each other down while the Necrons march inexorably to war, albeit in smallish numbers.  On turn two a unit of five warriors isn’t that big a deal, but it certainly can be by turn five.
  • In a way the Necrons end up being true “allies of convenience.”  Sure, they will help your side, but you have to be careful because you don’t have full control of their actions because your opponent probably controls some too.  If you both aren’t careful they can end up winning the game though this isn’t very likely.  What is more likely is one player will use the Necrons as a spoiler to win the game for himself.
  • I think Necron warriors are a good choice for the NPC faction because while they aren’t particularly powerful, nothing in the game is completely immune to them and can simply ignore them.
  • Blocking off specific portal entrances to try and funnel the Necrons closer to your opponent in order to manage their aggro turns out to be a viable strategy, though a double-edged one because in doing this one’s own forces have to put themselves close to the portal.
  • Another interesting mid-game tactic is to maneuver one’s forces off the objectives, etc. in order to temporarily force a situation where your opponent is leading by four points, insuring any new Necrons aggro onto her.  I say “her” advisedly because one of my IG opponents was able to do this to me!
  • The amount of Necron forces as constituted seems to work well for games in the 1000 – 1500 point range.  If I was playing lower than 1000 points I might use three warriors per squad instead of five, or maybe make it a random number such as D2+1.
  • The general consensus is that if the players are able to block off all four portal exits, then the Necrons should not be able to come onto the board at all rather than deep striking.  I agree and I will edit the basic scenario accordingly.