Space Wolf Jump Pack Trio

The new guy is the one in the middle.

After completing my goal of 1000 points of Space Wolves before the end of 2014, I’ve drastically slowed down but not stopped adding to the army.  My goal now is to eventually get to 1500 points without having to use my husband’s Ultramarines as stand-in’s.

The latest addition is an assault marine pictured above between two of his friends, who I completed awhile ago now.  I got a good deal on a couple of boxes of figures because I bought them right before the new ones came out as part of updating the Space Marine codex.  My latest assault marine has seen a few battles now as a Wolf Guard Battle Leader, though once I get the rest of the box done he will probably find himself among the Skyclaws.

As usual I painted his power armor with Mechanicus Standard Grey, followed by a heavy wash of Badab Black, then a dry brush of Administratum Grey.  When I first started my Space Wolves I tried highlighting their armor, but didn’t like how clean and polished they ended up looking.  I wanted a sort of no frills, “rougher” look without doing a bunch of environmental effects like sand or mud.  I found that simply dry brushing the armor gave me the effect I was looking for.

So once I finish up the Skyclaws, I’ll have to decide which of the four projects I want to work on next.  I have a vindicator that has been sitting around half finished for a very long time now.  Alternately, a Stormwolf might be a worthy addition to my forces, adding some needed air support and especially anti-air.  Third, I’d eventually like a Void Claw formation because I usually field a lot of terminators who arrive by deep strike.  I’ve been using the aegis line with a comm relay and want another option for keeping my reserve rolls reliable.  Especially one my opponent can’t potentially use as well.  So I’ll need to paint and magnetize a bunch of lightning claw arms to go on my existing terminators.

Lastly, my liaison officer has been calling on our friends the Ultramarines for devastator help for long enough now.  It is high it is time to load honors and accolades upon my husband’s loyal, blue friends and send them in glory back to Ultramar and paint some long fangs to take the place of these puissant worthies.

Daemonkin, Necrons and Orks (1000 Points)

Warriors freshly awoken from their (apparently not) eternal slumber.

Necrons

  • HQ: Lord with resurrection orb and staff of light = 75
  • Troop: Warriors (10) = 130
  • Troop: Warriors (10) = 130

Khorne Daemonkin

  • HQ: Herald = 55
  • Troop: Bloodletters (8) = 80
  • Fast Attack: Flesh Hounds (5) = 80

Orks

  • HQ: Weirdboy (level 2 psyker) = 70
  • Troop: Choppa Boyz (22); nob w/ big choppa & boss pole, one rokkit = 151
  • Troop: Shoota Boyz (23); nob w/ big choppa & boss pole, two big shootas = 191
  • Troop: Gretchin (11) = 38

This list uses two Combined Arms Detachments, with either the Orks or Necrons being the primary force.  The Daemonkin are allies.  The overall warlord could either be the psyker or the lord.

Interestingly (and who knew?) Khorne heralds are apparently consummate diplomats.  The Orks and Necrons don’t trust each other and optimally tend to keep their distance during the fighting, whereas the daemons are free to mingle with either side.  I suspect that the Orks intuit that they and the horned boyz both just want to “get stuck in”.  As for the Necrons, they probably find Daemonkin behavior extremely predictable and so their actions don’t play merry hell with logical calculations and circuitry.  Certainly can’t say that about the greenskins!

Khornate gribblies encounter the Imperium of Man

I’ve played my Terrible Trio now a few times in casual games and they’ve done alright.  Win about half the time and that is what I’m hoping for.  My general 40K list building philosophy is if I’m winning or losing more than about half the time against my regular opponents of similar skill and luck, then something is wrong with my list and it either needs to be toned down or toughened up.

The “desperate allies” thing can be a challenge, so what I usually do is deploy the Necrons first, often lining up against whatever armor my opponent plunks down if I’m setting up second.  Then the Orks rank up after that with the daemons either deep striking or deploying to take advantage of terrain or something I see in the set up.  One common theme is I use the khornate forces to protect the Necrons from close combat.

Why play this odd combination?  Story-wise it is easy to justify almost anything.  The real reason is I haven’t been painting Daemonkin very long and I wanted to use my painted models in games.  In general, playing with models I paint is the engine that keeps me painting.  As for the Necrons, someone gave me a bunch of models, which I’ve put into the paint stripper and have been slowly refurbishing.  Ditto on not having enough to field a proper army.  So I team up both factions with my main painted forces — the Orks.

Saga of Zeath the Unforgotten

From Phil Kelly’s 2009 Space Wolves codex:  “Sagas are intended to encourage players to develop some seriously cool names and stories for their Space Wolves characters.  You’ll find that after a few games your heroes become a lot more interesting as they accrue personal histories of victory and (dare we say it?) defeat.”

Zeath’s Current and Past Exploits

Spring 2015: Zeath distinguished himself during a series of highly successful raids into the Farsight Enclaves after the legion’s attempts at diplomacy failed.  (“What nice planets you people have, it sure would be a shame if anything happened to them.”)  As a result he was promoted to a full Mystic, which is what Legion VI-13 calls its rune priests.

Circa 2013-14: Survived implantation of Canis Helix Type N, which also saw an increase in his psychic powers and capacity for physical regeneration.  The process also has driven him somewhat mad where he is haunted by daemons both in his dreams and literally on the battlefield, which usually coincides when he is in the middle of hard fighting.

He did well in various skirmishes, raids, and battles and was eventually promoted to a sky claw sergeant.  Not only did Zeath have a talent for jump infantry tactics, the young sky claws respected his daring and feared his anger so they more often than not would obey his orders. Happily, his orders were usually some variation on, “Kill them!  Kill them all!”

Circa 2012: Zeath was a psyker on a Black Ship crippled and raided by ships from what is known in imperial records as Traitor Legion VI-13. When asked his name by his space marine captors/saviors, he said, “Zeath the Unforgotten,” but would never say to what the sobriquet referred.  Not being ones to unnecessarily press into matters concerning a man’s private affairs, the space marines nodded and moved on with their invasive medical examinations.

Some Personal Notes

  • Zeath is a level 1 psyker, level 2 if the “runes are right.”  He will often have powers from either the Tempestas or Daemonology-Malefic disciplines, occasionally both.
  • Note that he doesn’t actively summon daemons.  They just sort of appear when he rages in battle.  Blood with pour from his eyes, spikes will break out all over his flesh, which he ends up ripping out himself after the battle using a pair of pliers (too embarrassing to bother the medics about), and so on.
  • Preferred war gear is power armor, runic axe, plasma pistol and jump pack.  There is no way the ironsmiths will entrust him with anything better.  With all of the teeth, charms, talismans and amulets he wears at all times, if he received a particularly favorable cast of the battle bones from the Invisible Seers then he’ll have “counts as” artificer armor nonetheless due to the power of his faith in forces he neither understands nor even has a name for.
  • He loves the risk of discharging his plasma pistol and will do so even when it would be just as easy to throw a grenade.  He’s been known to purposefully overload the weapon and throw it as an ersatz melta bomb.  (Thus occasionally I’ll pay the points and include melta bombs and give his crazy tactic a chance of working.)
  • On a personal note Zeath has three wives but no children.  He had a pet fenrisian wolf but it turned into a blood thirster due to circumstances best not mentioned and he barely managed to kill it with his force axe while it was messily manifesting.  The daemon ate his left hand but it grew back better than new with little suction cups on the fingertips.  Such are the gifts of the Fates!

“Break Their Will” Scenario

Aerial view of trench bombardment.

I first saw this scenario at Mythic Games in Santa Cruz, California.  It was their 40K “Scenario of the Week” at the time.  I liked it because while fairly simple, it promoted a style of play that was a little different than the classic Eternal War or Maelstrom missions.

Set up is as per a standard game of 40K.  There are no secondary objectives, nor are any objective markers placed on the board. Night Fighting wasn’t listed either, though I suppose if both sides agreed you could include that rule. The game ends as per the normal rules.

Players achieve victory points by meeting the following conditions:

  • One victory point for each enemy unit reduced to half strength or below.
  • Two victory points for each enemy independent character killed.
  • One victory point for each challenge won.
  • One victory point for each of your units over half strength in the enemy deployment zone at the end of the game.

Our “Break Their Will” Battles

Khorne Daemonkin, Orks, and Necrons vs. Orks (1000 points, August 2015).  A hard fought battle on both sides with many failed charges by the orks on both sides with the end game turning into a bit of a swirling battle of annihilation in the center of the board.  The mixed forces won a solid but by no means overwhelming victory.

  Ultramarines vs. Space Wolves (1250 points, Spring 2015).  A tough “war game” battle between two chapters honing their tactics.  The Space Wolves were aggressive, especially their chaplain, but what these men of the Fang had going for them in ferocity they lacked in experience.  The war games were close but in the end the Ultramarines, led by a highly experienced Captain Reuben, taught the new comers some valuable lessons they won’t forget when they battle the enemies of Mankind.