Neglected Tankbusta with Can Opener

I started this guy probably back sometime in 2016 with the idea of him being another ork with a rokkit launcha to use in my then nascent tankbusta squad.  Then I remembered a conversion I liked, which I had seen maybe in 2014 or so.  It looked pretty easy so I thought I might give it a try myself.  I never did finish the model so I thought it would make a good candidate for Azazel’s May 2018 Neglected Model Challenge.  As is my unintentional custom, I present my offering on the last day of the month.

The red helmet and belt buckle denotes his status as a Tankbusta.

The conversion was easy enough.  I chopped the end off of a rokkit launcha, saving the rocket to stick on the end of a slugga to make it a rokkit pistol.  Then I cut the fleshy bits off of a power klaw, cemented the two together and added some small trukk pieces to hide my cuts and pretty it up a bit.

Painting the klaw thingie/can opener/kan opena was easy enough as well.  I used the recipe from Warhammer TV: based with Leadbelcher, washed with Typhus Corrosion, dry brush with Ryza Rust, then more dry brushing and a few edge highlights with steel/silver.

His shoulder didn’t turn out as I hope:  Blood for the Blood God! to the rescue.

I’m not sure about the all-over corrosion effect.  I like it but at the same time in the future I might try a variation where instead of Typhus, I just use some slightly watered down brown paint and eschew the particulates or maybe just do them in patches.

So next month Azazel is having a challenge where you complete a unit, whether finishing one you already started or from scratch.  I have many candidates.  Some, such as the Work-in-Progress Nurglings are eminently doable while others, like my hideously neglected cultists, are probably wishful thinking.  As for the orks, well, I have a functionally unlimited supply of those guys … could always use some more tankbustas or some more boyz.

ork bullet point graphic

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24 thoughts on “Neglected Tankbusta with Can Opener

  1. Oh i saw this the other day! This might be the firt model i saw of yours and my friend Krakendoomcool who writes on the blog with me collects both Nurgle AND Orks, so i cant waut to show him your stuff. This is such a simole but awesome idea! It strikes me as an Ork version of a halberd or something… Long but more choppy. I love it. 😁

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  2. Pingback: Neglected Model May ’18 Painting Challenge – Community Round-Up | Azazel's Bitz Box.

  3. Oh weird, so the Typhus Corrosion adds the granules of texture? I swear I didn’t see that when I used it last. I must not have mixed it up well enough. Not sure that I’ve cracked open my pot of Ryza Rust yet either.

    Anyways, nice model. I always love seeing the Orks. Out of curiosity is the claw used to crack open the armor or flip over the tank?

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    • Yes, there are little particles in it, though not as pronounced as my pictures would lead one to believe. I think in general the klaw is used to crack open stuff, though I’m sure that orks being the creatures they are could come up with all sorts of creative uses for it. 🙂

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      • I imagine with two of them they could probably get in a position to tip over a tank, and then it’s easy pickins on the soft underside.

        I’ll have to check out my Typhus Corrosion next time I use it. Though I also dumped half of it on my desk (@#$% GW Bottles!!), so who knows what half is left. 😦

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        • Heh, yeah, I’m sure a couple (or more) of them could get together and flip over a tank. The tankbustas probably have this sort of dastardly maneuver patented, I’m sure. As for the rank and file boyz, I have often thought of them surrounding a vehicle and rocking it, eventually flipping it over. That reminds me of a tournament I played in some years ago where I mentioned to my opponent that was what my boyz were doing when they wrecked his melta tanks in close combat.

          https://annwycoff.wordpress.com/2014/10/02/swords-against-tanks/

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  4. This is where I know I’m safe – Nurgle’s minions are just not going to spell Tankbusta with that second “a” so I can safely enjoy reading this post after having a late lunch! Great mini and that claw is brilliant! Looking forward to seeing tiny tank kill marks painted on his helmet once he gets into action, sorry akshun, I’ve not quite got the hang of this yet!

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    • Yep, you are pretty safe. Most of my orks in their spirit of martial pride tend not to go into battle allowing gretchin to tie their (the orks, not the grots, … what they get up to is beneath contempt) entrails into knots or displaying their internal organs for all and sundry to marvel over.

      Thank you, I like the klaw quite a lot, even if I’m only about 80% satisfied with how it came out and maybe 60% satisfied with the pictures. I’m 100% satisfied with the weapon itself though. I doubt he’ll ever get any kill marks. My tankbustas have a couple of problems with doing that: 1. They generally don’t live long enough to bother. Attrition is high. 2. They have gotten their minds wrapped around the fact that part of their tankbusta ethos is that they have red helmets and a red belt buckle. So they repaint them after every battle so they are all nice and red again.

      There was once a legend about an Tankbusta Ancynt who marked his kills but he couldn’t figure out what to do once he got to ten kills. The tank killer veterans whisper in awe that this near-mythical worthy survived six battles!

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  5. Nice work here Ann, and good to see you got one in. 🙂
    I agree on the Typhus Corrosion – the stuff can look good but it can almost as often look a bit sketchy. Kinda like the 2nd-ed-era habit of mixing sand with the paint for *all* of the buildings. Vallejo has some pretty good acrylic rust washes that I’ve been using recently, as well as the odd model air rust-coloured paints.

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    • I’m not entirely happy with it, but it does look quite a bit less grainy in person than the pictures with the possible exception of the klaw blades. I might try re-taking the pictures this weekend, but then again I might not. Not sure it really matters that much; might find that my mood will be (as it so often is) to move onto the next project, but we’ll see.

      I agree with you about the Vallejo rust washes. I’ve used some of those in the past, though oddly mostly on plaguebearer warts and such.

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  6. I like this guy a lot – great conversion idea! The all-over approach with the Typhus Corrosion is a bit heavy for my taste, but it doesn’t look too out of place on this gnarled veteren 🙂

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    • Thank you. Wanted to try out the recipe. My thinking was two-fold with making the weapon look the way it did: a) it is supposed to be a one use item, so there is no point in making it out of anything nice; b) Ork stuff tends to work for orks, no matter how crappy the item, if they believe it’ll work and I wanted to remind myself of this lovely truth. 🙂

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  7. Very nice DIY feeling to the dude. If you can’t get a Panzerfaust just take a massive claw. The subtle weathering works well, but some chipping and heavier rust build up in some place may add further interest and contrast. I could also see some yellow black warning stripes on the claw. Anyhow, that comes down personal preferences and does not detract from a paintjob well done.

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    • Thanks. Indeed, that is very true! Thank you for the suggestions, always food for thought for future guys, that is for sure. 🙂 I can’t say that I’m a fan of hazard striping in general though, but I agree it could add variety and interest.

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  8. I love the concept. Might have to borrow this conversion idea if I get back to doing Orks again at some point. I think it does need a different approach to the weathering, tho. The Typhus Corrosion, in this case, gives more of an impression that you spray primed it when it was too humid and your primer fuzzed out on you. Or maybe just apply the Typhus Corrosion in some of the cracks and corners, where gunk and such might build up more.

    I’ve been having trouble getting the hang of Ryza Rust myself. It’s just so bright! I find myself putting a bunch of Typhus Corrosion over it to tone it down, but even that doesn’t always do the trick.

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    • Oh, I also forgot to mention: It kind of reminds me of the grabber thing my grandmother had to help get things down from tall shelves. But stronger and sharper.

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      • Ha, I hadn’t thought of that. I have one of those but mine has suction cups on it. I use it for all sorts of wonderful things, mostly centered on the dual themes of being lazy and reaching things that are high or have fallen down behind something … wait, that is three things!

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    • Please do! I stole the idea from the interwebz myself. I might try your suggestion with the Typhus Corrosion next time on a different guy and see how it turns out. I did take some different pictures, which does make the klaw look more how it actually came out. Still a bit grainy but not as fuzzy as the old pics, which I agree, do tend to look like a bad prime job.

      Yeah, that Ryza Rust is bright, I agree. I sometimes use some Agrax or some of the Vallejo rust washes to tone it down where I think it is too bright. I don’t quite think I have the hang of it yet, but I’m having fun playing around with it. 🙂

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